Rosetta / Philae Mission selfie from 16 km

By Ben on October 14, 2014 at 11:40 pm | In Blog Posts | No Comments

Cool pic from 67P/C-G
–Ben

Rosetta / Philae Mission selfie from 16 km
If you thought last month’s mission ‘selfie’ from a distance of 50 km from Comet 67P/C-G was impressive, then prepare to be wowed some more: this one was taken from less than half that distance, at just 18 km from the centre of the comet, or about 16 km from the surface.

http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2014/10/14/mission-selfie-from-16-km/

Welcome to Laniakea

By Ben on September 4, 2014 at 10:57 pm | In Blog Posts | No Comments

you and your problems just got alot smaller.
–Ben

Earth’s address redefined with new galaxy map
For the first time, scientists have figured out where our Milky Way galaxy sits in relation to the 100,000 other galaxies within our newly discovered home supercluster, called Laniakea.

http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20140409-26124-2.html

Europe’s Rosetta probe goes into orbit around comet 67P

By Ben on August 13, 2014 at 10:56 am | In Blog Posts | No Comments

After 10 yrs five months and four days we are finally there.

now man the harpoon.

–Ben

Europe’s Rosetta probe goes into orbit around comet 67P

Europe’s Rosetta probe has arrived at a comet after a 10-year chase.

In a first for space history, the spacecraft was manoeuvred alongside a speeding body to begin mapping its surface in detail.

The spacecraft fired its thrusters for six and a half minutes to finally catch up with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

“We’re at the comet!” said Sylvain Lodiot of the European Space Agency (Esa) operations centre in Germany.

“After 10 years, five months and four days travelling towards our destination, looping around the Sun five times and clocking up 6.4 billion km, we are delighted to announce finally ‘we are here’,” said Jean-Jacques Dordain, director general of Esa….

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-28659783

many nice pics here

http://www.universetoday.com/113712/stunning-images-from-rosetta-show-closeup-views-of-comet-67pchuryumov-gerasimenko/

Cassini Tracks Clouds Developing Over a Titan Sea

By Ben on August 13, 2014 at 10:47 am | In Blog Posts | No Comments

Cool animated GIF.
–Ben

Cassini Tracks Clouds Developing Over a Titan Sea

This animated sequence of Cassini images shows methane clouds moving above
the large methane sea on Saturn’s moon Titan known as Ligeia Mare.
? Full image and caption

August 12, 2014

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft recently captured images of clouds moving across
the northern hydrocarbon seas of Saturn’s moon Titan. This renewed weather
activity, considered overdue by researchers, could finally signal the
onset of summer storms that atmospheric models have long predicted.

A movie showing the clouds’ movement is available at:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=PIA18420A

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2014-274

On the Benefits of Promoting Diversity of Ideas

By Ben on May 26, 2014 at 12:36 pm | In Blog Posts | No Comments

As a friend of mine once said, “You know something big is about to happen in
science when some prominent person in the field says that it CAN’T be done.”
–Ben

On the Benefits of Promoting Diversity of Ideas

“It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble.
It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so. ”
–Mark Twain

A very common flaw of astronomers is to believe that they know t
he truth even when data is scarce.

This fault is the trademark of a data-starved science. It occasionally leads to major blunders by which the scientific community makes the wrong
strategic decision in its research plans, causing unnecessary delays in finding the truth…

http://arxiv.org/pdf/1405.2954v1.pdf

Spacecraft Returns Seven Particles From Birth of the Solar System

By Ben on March 22, 2014 at 1:06 am | In Blog Posts | No Comments

another win for crowd sourced citizen science.
–Ben

Spacecraft Returns Seven Particles From Birth of the Solar System
THE WOODLANDS, TEXAS—After a massive, years-long search, researchers have recovered seven interstellar dust particles returned to Earth by the Stardust spacecraft. The whole sample, reported here this week at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, weighs just a few trillionths of a gram, but it’s the first time scientists have laid their hands on primordial material unaltered by the violent birth of the solar system….

…Once the sample panel was back on Earth, the problem quickly became finding any collected particles embedded in the aerogel. Out of desperation, Stardust team members called on 30,714 members of the general public. “We really did not know how else to find” the embedded particles, says Stardust team member Andrew Westphal of the University of California, Berkeley. The “dusters” of the Stardust@home project—who as a group were listed as authors of the talk—volunteered to examine microscopic images taken down through the aerogel. They used the world’s best pattern-recognition system—the human eye and brain—to pick out the telltale tracks left by speeding particles….

http://news.sciencemag.org/space/2014/03/spacecraft-returns-seven-particles-birth-solar-system

Looking Backward: Curiosity gazes upon the setting Earth Earth sets over Gale crater

By Ben on February 7, 2014 at 2:31 am | In Blog Posts | No Comments

cool pic.
–Ben

Looking Backward: Curiosity gazes upon the setting Earth
Earth sets over Gale crater
On sol 529 (January 31, 2014), the rover looked westward after sunset to see a brilliant evening star — Earth — setting toward the horizon.


http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2014/02050918-curiosity-earthset.html

Beyond the Visible: The Story of the Very Large Array

By Ben on December 31, 2013 at 3:09 pm | In Blog Posts | No Comments

I thought I had posted a link to this youtube NRAO video months ago, but I don’t seem to.
Sorry for the delay.

–Ben

Beyond the Visible: The Story of the Very Large Array
Created in 2013 as the new interpretive film for the National Radio Astronomy Observatory’s Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) public Visitor Center, this 24-minute production explores the synergies of technology and human curiosity that power the world’s most productive radio telescope. Narrated by Academy Award-winning actress Jodie Foster (star of the film “Contact,” which was based on the novel by Carl Sagan and filmed at the VLA), the program depicts many of the people whose diverse efforts enable the VLA to be a cutting-edge resource for astronomers and humanity worldwide…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RqX9vLj3_7w

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spies Chang’e 3 and Yutu

By Ben on December 31, 2013 at 3:00 pm | In Blog Posts | No Comments

nice ‘blink’ images.
–Ben

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spies Chang’e 3 and Yutu
As promised, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter’s sharp eyes spotted the Chang’e 3 lander and Yutu rover on the lunar surface on December 25. The hardware shows up as a few bright pixels throwing long, dark shadows, clearly visible in a before-and-after comparison. The lander is the bigger blob, the rover a much smaller one…

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2013/12301431-lunar-reconnaissance-orbiter-change3.html

Happy Holidays from near by Galaxies

By Ben on December 25, 2013 at 2:40 pm | In Blog Posts | No Comments

Greetings from the universe to you and yours.

–Ben

This holiday message is constructed from galaxy images provided by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Galaxy Zoo.


http://utprosim.com/happyholidays/

Next Page »

Entries and comments feeds. Valid XHTML and CSS. ^Top^
26 queries. 0.230 seconds.
Powered by WordPress with jd-nebula theme design by John Doe.
This site runs like Clockwork.